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I wrote a new article “Korean American Women and the Church: Identity, Spirituality, and Gender Roles” for Feminist Theology Journal. Hope you get a chance to read it.

Celebrate AAPI Heritage Month by reading more work by the AAPI community.

Korean American Women and the Church: Identity, Spirituality, and Gender Roles

Grace Ji-Sun Kim First Published September 11, 2020 

Research Article https://doi.org/10.1177/0966735020944893

Article information 

Article Information

Volume: 29 issue: 1, page(s): 18-32

Article first published online: September 11, 2020; 

Issue published: September 1, 2020

Grace Ji-Sun Kim

Earlham School of Religion, Earlham College, USA
Corresponding Author:

Grace Ji-Sun Kim, Earlham School of Religion, Earlham College, Richmond, IN, USA. Email: gjskim@hotmail.com

Abstract

Korean American women are the foundation of the Korean American church. We are devoted, contributing members in the church, but we are seldom given positions of leadership or power. From our subordinate role in the church and wider society, Korean American women have been perpetually subject to racial and gender injustice. To work toward equal empowerment, it is imperative to reimagine historical Christian teaching about God so that it liberates rather than oppresses. As we engage in theological reform, we can begin to experience the wholeness that comes from a Spirit God who embraces all people regardless of race, gender, sexuality, or social status. As a result, Korean American women can finally feel included and contributive to a society which has historically treated them as “perpetual foreigners.” They can also push for multicultural excellence rather than sustaining the dominant white criterion of value. As hybrid spaces proliferate in diversifying America, Korean American women can be an integral source of reimagining the places we inhabit, something that proves to be increasingly necessary to keep the church accessible and contemporary.

Keywords Asian Americanhybridityimmigrationpostcolonialismwomen