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So honored to have Intersectional Theology cowritten with Susan Shaw included in the Best Theology Books of 2018 by Englewood Review of Books.  Get your copy today

Here are twelve of the best theology books of 2018:

One of the distinctive parts of our mission here at the ERB is recommending substantial theology books that deserve to be read not only among academics, but also in churches, as we seek to discern what faithfulness to the way of Jesus looks like in our particular places amidst all the challenges of the twenty-first century.

So, in addition to our Advent calendar of 2018’s Best Books 
(which will feature a few of the following books), 
we offer this deeper look at the year’s best theology books. 
***What other books would you add to this list?

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Intersectional Theology: An Introductory Guide 

Grace Ji-Sun Kim /
Susan Shaw

Fortress Press

Intersectional Theology: An Introductory Guide offers a pathway for reflective Christians, pastors, and theologians to apply the concepts and questions of intersectionality to theology. Intersectionality is a tool for analysis, developed primarily by black feminists, to examine the causes and consequences of converging social identities (gender, race, class, sexual identity, age, ability, nation, religion) within interlocking systems of power and privilege (sexism, racism, classism, heterosexism, ableism, ageism, nativism) and to foster engaged, activist work toward social justice. Applied to theology, intersectionality demands attention to the Christian thinker’s own identities and location within systems of power and the value of deep consideration of complementary, competing, and even conflicting points of view that arise from the experiences and understandings of diverse people.

This book provides an overview of theories of intersectionality and suggests questions of intersectionality for theology, challenging readers to imagine an intersectional church, a practice of welcome and inclusion rooted in an ecclesiology that embraces difference and centers social justice.

Rather than providing a developed systematic theology, Intersectional Theology encourages readers to apply its method in their own theologizing to expand their own thinking and add their experiences to a larger theology that moves us all toward the kin-dom of God.

Can “White” People Be Saved?: Triangulating Race, Theology, and Mission 

Love L. Sechrest, Johnny Ramírez-Johnson,
Amos Yong, Eds.

IVP Academic

No one is born white. But while there is no biological basis for a white race, whiteness is real. What’s more, whiteness as a way of being in the world has been parasitically joined to Christianity, and this is the ground of many of our problems today. It is time to redouble the efforts of the church and its institutions to muster well-informed, gospel-based initiatives to fight racialized injustice and overcome the heresy of whiteness. Written by a world-class roster of scholars, Can “White” People Be Saved?develops language to describe the current realities of race and racism. It challenges evangelical Christianity in particular to think more critically and constructively about race, ethnicity, migration, and mission in relation to white supremacy. Historical and contemporary perspectives from Africa and the African diaspora prompt fresh theological and missiological questions about place and identity. Native American and Latinx experiences of colonialism, migration, and hybridity inspire theologies and practices of shalom. And Asian and Asian American experiences of ethnicity and class generate transnational resources for responding to the challenge of systemic injustice. With their call for practical resistance to the Western whiteness project, the perspectives in this volume can revitalize a vision of racial justice and peace in the body of Christ.

 

Healing Our Broken Humanity, co-written with Graham Hill was included in their list of Best Books of 2018.  Thank you to readers and to Englewood Review of Books.

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